Question: What is FAS facial features?

Characteristic facial features in a child with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Findings may include a smooth philtrum, thin upper lip, upturned nose, flat nasal bridge and midface, epicanthal folds, small palpebral fissures, and small head circumference.

What FAS looks like?

Distinctive facial features, including small eyes, an exceptionally thin upper lip, a short, upturned nose, and a smooth skin surface between the nose and upper lip. Deformities of joints, limbs and fingers. Slow physical growth before and after birth. Vision difficulties or hearing problems.

How does fetal alcohol syndrome affect facial features?

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) Three specific facial abnormalities: smooth philtrum (the area between nose and upper lip), thin upper lip, small palpebral fissures (the horizontal eye openings) Growth deficit (lower than average height, weight or both)

When do FAS facial features develop?

A babys facial features are formed during weeks six to nine of pregnancy. Professor Neil McIntosh, an Edinburgh-based neonatologist, says scientific evidence shows that mothers who drink during this three-week window are more likely to have babies with the facial deformities associated with FAS.

Can FASD be diagnosed without facial features?

No single facial feature is diagnostic of FAS, but the constellation of short palpebral fissure, smooth philtrum and thin vermilion upper lip are characteristic features.

How can you tell if someone has FASD?

Signs and SymptomsLow body weight.Poor coordination.Hyperactive behavior.Difficulty with attention.Poor memory.Difficulty in school (especially with math)Learning disabilities.Speech and language delays. •21 May 2021

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